Traditional recipes

Norway Plans Space Farm

Norway Plans Space Farm

Norway is looking to grow food in space

Wikimedia/NASA

A team of research scientists from Norway is trying to grow food plants in space.

While others might dream of fighting aliens or staging zero-gravity trampoline contests, a team of Norwegian scientists has come up with a far more practical plan for space and has announced plans to try to grow food plants on the International Space Station.

According to The Local, a 10-year project announced Friday is called Time Scale and will be researching how food plants can be grown in space to supply astronauts with food and possibly oxygen. The exact crops have not yet been determined, but the research team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology says they’re considering starting with lettuce, tomatoes, and soybeans.

"One of the big challenges is to administer exactly the right amount of water and nutrients to the plants in such little gravity,” said project leader Ann-Iren Kittang Jost.

The end goal is to have a self-sustaining ecosystem in space by 2050, but in the meantime, astronauts will at least be able to enjoy some fresher salads.


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!


Fjellbrød – A Nutritious Norwegian Bread

Yes, I copied and pasted the letter “ø”. When I dive into Scandinavian cuisines, there are all sorts of new letters that I need to find hidden in my keyboard.

A few weeks ago I cooked “Fiskeboller”, aka Norwegian fish balls for some friends. The balls were given to me as a gift in a beautiful green can by a visiting friend (I call him “The Norwegian”) and I thought it would be nice to bake some delicious bread with it – of course, it had to be Norwegian too! And everywhere I looked, I came across this bread, which was the exact same recipe everywhere, and was originally given by Nigella Lawson.


As it was only Nigella who called it “Norwegian Mountain Bread” and almost everyone referred to her, I had to make sure that what I baked was real Norwegian bread. So I asked “The Norwegian” if it is real and he gave me the Norwegian name: fjellbr..(wait i have to paste it)..ød.


In any case, whatever its nationality is, this bread is extremely delicious and also very nutritious. There are all sorts of seeds in it, there is no white flour but a mixture of whole-wheat and rye flour, plus, there are rolled oats. In regular, basic bread recipes, there is always some time when you leave the bread dough to rise, and most of the time you also have to leave it for final proofing. But this bread does not need any of that! It is a no-knead bread and you put the dough in the oven while it is heating, so you save time!

If you leave it covered in room temperature, this bread stays in good condition for 3-4 days! This is good because you can eat only 1 (maybe 2, if you are really hungry) slice at one meal, it is really filling. Do try it, and you’ll see!

Wow and I just realized: this is the first Norwegian recipe in my blog – and certainly not the last one, as I am starting to seriously love Norwegian cuisine!

(makes 1 loaf)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl milk (I used whole milk as usual, täysmaito)
1 cup plus 2 tbsp / 2.7 dl lukewarm water
2 plus 1/4 tsp / 11 ml dry yeast
3 cups / 7.2 dl whole-wheat flour
1 cup / 2.4 dl rye flour
1/4 cup / 0.6 dl rolled oats (Finnish: kaurahiutale)
1 tbsp / 15 ml light brown sugar
1 plus 1/2 tsp / 7.5 ml salt (I used Himalayan sea salt)
3 tbsp pumpkin seeds (Finnish: kurpitsansiemen)
3 tbsp sunflower seeds (Finnish: auringonkukansiemen)
3 tbsp flaxseeds (Finnish: pellavansiemen)

and a bit more seed mixture to spread on top..



1. Pour milk in a pan and heat it a little just until it is lukewarm.


2. In a mixing bowl, pour lukewarm water, lukewarm milk and yeast and leave it for 10 minutes. It should look like the last photo at the end of 10 minutes.


3. In another mixing bowl, put remaining, dry ingredients: whole-wheat flour, rye flour, rolled oats, sugar, salt and seeds and mix a little.


4. Pour liquid yeast mixture into dry ingredients and mix until all dry ingredients are covered with liquid. It will be an extremely sticky dough.


5. Flour your kitchen counter generously, scrape the sticky dough onto the surface, with the help of the extra flour on the surface (and maybe even more, if you feel like you need it) put the dough together on the counter and try to make a rough loaf shape.


6. Butter your loaf pan and put the dough in it. Put extra seeds on the surface generously.


7. Put the loaf in the oven, in middle rack, and heat the oven to 100C. After 30 minutes, put boiling water in an oven-proof pan and put the pan at the base of the oven. Increase the heat to 175C and bake for 1 more hour. At the end of it, test with a toothpick in the middle, if baked well, take it out of the oven.


8. After about 5 minutes, take the bread out of the mould. Leave it to completely cool down on a wire rack. Eat your first slice with a nice layer of butter on.. Yummmm!